Tag: current-events

Justice Delayed, No Longer Denied

By Mary Griggs

One little known aspect of the policy against “homosexuality” for the US military was that service members who were discharged for being gay or lesbian, had their separation pay cut in half. The policy, which was not part of the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” statute was, therefore, not changed with the law was repealed. Laura Schauer Ives, managing attorney for the ACLU of New Mexico, rightly called this a “double dose of discrimination.” The ACLU The American Civil Liberties Union and the ACLU of New Mexico had filed a class action lawsuit against the policy.

Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-Recession babies more likely to be delinquents?
-Surreal textbook illustrations from the 1970s.
-Need to peruse the ancient letters of St. Paul? There’s an app for that.
-A new spin on historic sites – digital caves.
-The class politics of vaccinations.
-The entrepreneurial historian.

Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-Japan may un-apologize to WWII “comfort women.”
-Meet the perfect woman circa 1912.
-MythBusting the corset.
-New Zealand’s weirdest archival secrets.
-An imperial tomb too deadly to explore?
-Jack Klugman’s unheralded role in America’s medical history.

Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-What’s in your belly button? (Hint: ewww…gross.)
-The forgotten history of 20th century drugs.
-The history of female genital mutilation.
-The nautical roots of the modern tattoo.
-The troubled history behind the stolen babies of Spain.
-1860s fundraising efforts for emancipated slaves.

Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-A new reality show will shame women who had abortions.
-Where are all the female geniuses?
-7 ways women are sexualized, stereotyped, or underrepresented in media.
-A history of disability.
-Can Viagra make better athletes?
-A small Colorado town’s big role in shaping the National Mall.

Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-The weirdest claims made by “Designer Vagina” websites.
-Civil War underwear.
-Japanese-American internee letters found hidden in wall.
-The historian’s curse.
-New study shows disabled parents often lose custody of their children.
-Girls in juvenile detention face health care issues.
-Is neuroscience under attack?

Motivation for Change in Ireland

By Helen McBride

It’s no surprise that laws concerning family planning have remained within a grey area in Ireland. Following the tragedy of Savita Halappanavar’s death, Amnesty International has called upon Ireland to clean up its act. Halappanavar entered University Hospital, Galway on 21st October due to severe back pain. This back pain was diagnosed as a symptom of a miscarriage, being 17 weeks pregnant at the time. Halappanavar later died on 28th October, the cause being classified as septicaemia. The situation has been explained by Halappanavar’s husband that upon discovering the miscarriage, they repeatedly asked for a medical termination, as Halappanavar was in substantial pain. This request was denied repeatedly over three days. RTE has outlined the timeline of events.

Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-Strangest modern-day menstruation myths.
-Is neuroscience helping vegetative patients communicate with their doctors?
-The history behing the father of the modern cigarette.
-Eugenics and Nikola Tesla.
-How not to run a secure archive.
-Recording of Lee Atwater’s infamous 1981 interview released for the first time.
-Is your illness named after a Nazi?

Sunday Morning Medicine

-Sex and polio in the movies.
-Your condoms are not made in Condom, France.
-Oldest message in a bottle found.
-Why abortion apologies hurt the pro-choice cause.
-Ancient Korean love letter unearthed.
-The dangers of deconstructing women.