Marie Branch and the Power of Nursing

In June 2020, when millions took to the streets in the midst of a pandemic to protest police attacks on Black lives, public statements began to trickle out of major nursing organizations. The American Nurses Association (ANA) called racism “a public health crisis,” while the American Association of Colleges of Nursing declared that “racism will… Read more →

Image of the instructive card sold with the Little Suffragist Doll pattern

The Little Suffragist Doll: Cotton, White Supremacy, and Sweet Little Dolls

What does a pattern for doll-making have to tell us about the racial and gender politics of American suffragists in the 1910s? The Little Suffragist Doll sewing pattern from 1914 seems quite simple. Her front and back printed on cotton cloth, this smiling little doll-in-waiting begs to be made three-dimensional. She is rosy-cheeked and bedecked… Read more →

More Recent Articles

Eight black women stand around a table. The woman in the center is holding a baby wrapped in a blanket, but the blankeet is suspended from a scale. The baby might be a doll

Constructing the Modern American Midwife: White Supremacy and White Feminism Collide

The year 2020 marks one of those global tipping points – time divided into pre-COVID and the promise of after COVID, as well as open rallying cries to topple white patriarchal supremacy. Serendipitously, it also marks the Year of the Nurse and the Midwife, per the World Health Organization. We were excited: as two practicing,… Read more →

Post-Pandemic Architecture Needs to Be Healthier

As an architecture student, I’d normally be building a model in my studio on campus right now. Instead, six months into quarantine, I’m still sitting in my makeshift home office worrying about my friends and family. The death toll climbs every day and my mom, who has an autoimmune disorder, is in the high-risk population…. Read more →

Bearing the Capitalist Economy: A Review of Alexandra J. Finley’s An Intimate Economy

The historiography of women’s lives under and role in slavery and the slave trade has changed substantially in the recent years with the publication of a number of award-winning books. Scholars such as Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers, Jessica Marie Johnson, Ariela J. Gross, and Marisa Fuentes have reshaped our understanding of the intersection of gender, race,… Read more →

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news How do pandemics end? When Japan reinvented filmmaking. How we lie to ourselves about history. A brief history of presidents and their taxes. How Early Modern empire changed medicine. The Black press and disinformation on Facebook. How the flu pandemic changed Halloween in 1918…. Read more →

Creating Community and Finding Connection: A Black Nurse’s Experience in Vietnam, 1966–67

Nobody wanted Elizabeth Allen in Vietnam. From her master’s advisor who questioned why on earth she would want to enlist in the first place, to the Air Force that dragged its feet on her application, to the Army, which initially wanted to assign her to teach at a military-sponsored nursing program at the University of… Read more →