Black and white illustration of a farm scene with a doctor in a cloak and hat pointing at a standing cow while a man and woman look concerned. A small child sits on the ground examining the doctor’s box and two other people in bonnets look out the door of the farmhouse.

The Heifer and Its Lymph: The Animal Vaccine Establishment’s Register Book

Few people I know like working at the UK National Archives. They find it too impersonal, too frigid, too strict. But since I first worked there in July 2014, it has become my archival home. The place is dependable — you can always find silence in the reading rooms, good espresso in the ground-floor café,… Read more →

Painting of four women, one handing a newly delivered baby to the mother.

Reproductive Justice and Midwifery on the US-Mexico Border

On August 29th, Kevin Sieff of the Washington Post published an article about the citizenship status of Americans born near the U.S.-Mexico border. According to Sieff, the State Department has been denying U.S. citizens passports, citing citizenship fraud via forged birth certificates certified by (likely) Mexican American midwives in rural areas of the Southwest. Following… Read more →

More Recent Articles

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news A diet for old age. The sensory history of pine. 9 cold remedies from history. The Texas archives war of 1842. A Viking, a sheep, and climate change. Sugar castles and suckling pig arches. Why I wanted to learn to perform abortions. Donald Duck:… Read more →

When Pain is Political: Paulette Nardal and Black Women’s Citizenship in the French Empire

October 12 marks the 122nd anniversary of the birth of Martinican writer and intellectual Paulette Nardal. It also marks 79 years since Nardal survived one of the first maritime attacks of World War II. She was travelling from the then-French colony of Martinique to Paris when her ship was torpedoed by a German U-Boat. Her… Read more →

A large crowd of protesters in front of the US Capitol building in Washington DC. A prominent sign in the foreground reads: I still believe Anita, I believe Christine, Believe Women.

The Privilege of Despair

A preternatural calm settled over me on Saturday afternoon as I heard the news of Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation to the Supreme Court. I wasn’t reconciled to the outcome; my calm did not come from satisfaction. Instead, it came from the awful confirmation of a different kind — that the United States was still the white… Read more →