Sunday Morning Medicine

  Contact your senators. Vote. May her memory be a revolution.

Mind the Gap: Motivational Pressure and a Gendered Pandemic

In the midst of the pandemic, articles by journalists, public figures, and scholars on how to capitalize on time spent at home have been rapidly increasing, particularly those with suggestions on improving productivity. These articles employ motivational pressure to push readers to invest in “who they want to become” post-coronavirus. Suggestions range from quarantine recipes… Read more →

Cite My Name, Cite My Name

A couple years back, I was co-teaching a graduate course on gender history at the University of Edinburgh. I was advising an MA student on historiographical literature, and I asked her if she used Google Scholar to locate scholarly references. She didn’t, so I demonstrated how to use the search tool. As an example, I… Read more →

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news Elvis in the box. “Are you popular?” Skating on stolen land. Jingle Dress Dancers and pandemics. Cannabis in the 1950s British tabloids. The hidden Black history of Lovecraft Country. Gerald Ford rushed out a vaccine. It was a fiasco. One sperm donor. 36 children…. Read more →

Dead Babies in Boxes: Dealing with the Consequences of Interrupted Reproduction

One morning in June 2019, two city workers in Lyon, France, pulled a plastic bag out of the river that runs through the city center and found it contained the body of a “late term fetus or a newborn baby thought to be less than a day old.” Such occurrences have a long history in… Read more →

Why I Say “Black Lives Matter”

Two paragraphs in my forthcoming book, Liberty and Insanity in the Age of the American Revolution, continue to haunt me. The paragraphs reference the 1770 protests in New Bern, North Carolina. Like their seventeenth-century English ancestors, these protestors believed that the people had a duty to “regulate” the government, and particularly to step in when… Read more →

“All the World’s a Harem”: Perceptions of Masked Women during the 1918–1919 Flu Pandemic

During the influenza epidemic that ravaged the United States in the fall and winter of 1918 and 1919, cities across the country advised or required masks. Soon, discussions of masks took center stage across American media. Newspapers were filled with articles explaining how to make, wear, and purchase masks. From their inception, these discussions were… Read more →

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news No rest. Past vaccine disasters. The history of Slim Jims. Black aging matters, too. The oldest cookbook in Korea. The real story of Black anarchists. The history of Black college football. Remember punk rock? Probably not. I’m so bored with the Lost Colonists. The… Read more →

Hygeia: Women in the Cemetery Landscape

We’ve all seen her. Hunched over the grave of an important poet. Standing meekly atop deceased philosophers, businessmen, and writers alike – head in hands and despairing. The Mourning Woman is a motif found throughout nineteenth-century Western cemeteries. She emerged during a revival of classical symbolism in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century gravestone iconography. She draws inspiration… Read more →

Motherhood, Undone: A Review of Belabored: A Vindication of the Rights of Pregnant Women by Lyz Lenz

One evening in early April, after yet another day of sending my toddler daughter to “Frozen school” while I attempted to work from home, I found myself in the woodshed, chucking pieces of firewood into the wall. I had wandered through to put the dogs out and when a few pieces fell dangerously close to… Read more →