Rediscovering (and Redefining) Clara Barton’s Story

The building was due to be demolished until a carpenter checked the attic. Among old socks and newspapers was a sign that read “Missing Soldiers Office, 3rd Story, Room 9, Miss. Clara Barton.” What the carpenter, Richard Lyons, had discovered was the remains of Clara Barton’s Washington, DC residence, where she had lived during and… Read more →

Irish Keens, Modern Grief, and the Digital Landscape of Mourning

In January 1833, an author known only as O’G published their musings on the Irish funeral cry, or caoine, in the Dublin Penny Journal. O’G described the cry as “the most singularly plaintive and mournful expression of excessive grief that could well be imagined.” In the article, O’G describes traveling the Irish countryside on horseback… Read more →

“ES LEY”: Argentina Legalizes Abortion

The flashing words “ES LEY” (It’s law!) marked the occasion: on December 30, 2020, Argentina’s Senate voted 38-29,with one abstention, to legalize abortion for any reason (“on demand”) in the first fourteen weeks of pregnancy. What’s more, public hospitals will provide the service free of charge. Argentina now joins its neighbor Uruguay, which legalized abortion… Read more →

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news Defoe and the Plague Year. Isn’t she good—for a woman? Remembering all of American history. The curious case of the Infant Sappho. The internet and American imperialism. What Bridgerton gets wrong about corsets. In The Gay Cookbook, domestic bliss was queer. Why we should… Read more →

African Americans, Slavery, and Nursing in the US South

In 2016, a statue of Jamaican-born nurse and businesswoman Mary Seacole was erected outside St Thomas’ Hospital in London. Seacole’s contribution to the war effort in the Crimea and to British life is well-known. Yet, the tribute – the first statue of a named Black woman in the UK – gathered vocal opposition from The… Read more →

Death by Proxy: What Twentieth-Century Infant Mortality Discourses in Brazil Can Tell Us About COVID-19

When the global death toll of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic surpassed one million in late September, the United States and Brazil registered the world’s two highest death counts. In the wake of this grim milestone, media outlets in both countries circulated various analogies to make sense of the scale of human loss. In Brazil, one… Read more →

Oscillating and Depreciating: Early Modern Spanish Views of Unsanctioned Female Healers

Antonio asks, “Do you believe that God will burn all of the sinners forever and ever when they die?” “Si,” replies his uncle Pedro as their old truck bumbles past a brothel where several women are hanging their laundry. While Antonio makes eye contact with one of the women hanging her clothes, he asks his… Read more →

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news When the waltz went solo. A year of intersex victories. Beware of vaccine euphoria. Witty, sexual – and menopausal. Emily Dickinson on spring break. How women lost status in saloons. COVID-19 vaccines and their metaphors. Ancient snack stall uncovered in Pompeii. The first Black… Read more →

Nursing Clio Presents Its Sixth Annual Best of List

2020 has been the worst of years, but the Nursing Clio staff still found a few things to enjoy. Favorite Book Laura Ansley: In times of stress, I reach for happy reading. And what’s more fitting than the guaranteed happily-ever-after of romance novels? Some of favorite reads in 2020 were Alexis Daria’s You Had Me… Read more →

Alone, Together: Memory and Death in a Pandemic

“You’re lucky, then, that your mom died before all this began,” my friend said. “At least you got to be there. At least you got a funeral.” However starkly her words hung between us, I knew she was right. As shattering as it was when my mom died in Tucson four days before my sister’s… Read more →