Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news Jane Austen’s whisper network. Do quarantines work? A history. A global history of the war on cannabis. Need an abortion? There’s an app for that. DNA sleuths read the coronavirus genome. Goth won’t die, but it wants a funeral anyway. Pigeons identify breast cancer… Read more →

Becoming Rodin’s Lover: Camille Claudel and Mental Illness

“Why have there been no great women artists?” feminist art historian Linda Nochlin asked in her 1971 essay of the same title. She explained that, while there have absolutely been women artists of skill, character, and genius, they have struggled against the social and institutional frameworks that encouraged their male counterparts. One of these women,… Read more →

The “Textile Memoir”: A Review of Threads of Life by Clare Hunter

I read this beautiful book as slowly as possible because I desperately did not want it to end. Part memoir and part history, Clare Hunter’s Threads of Life: A History of the World Through The Eye of A Needle (Abrams Press, 2019) is a gorgeous exploration of needlework in its contemporary and historical context that… Read more →

Fight Cancer like a Feminist

On May 2, 2018, I was coming out of anesthesia from an emergency appendectomy when I learned I might have cancer. After an excruciating five days in the hospital, my surgeon confirmed that I had moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma but was unsure as to the type of cancer. While it may sound cliché, my life quite… Read more →

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news Your chemical romance. The work of getting clean. War can never be feminist. A brief history of royal titles. The healthiest baby I ever had. California’s forgotten slave history. Labor solidarity is the best medicine. Trans women and uterus transplants. The ERA and anti-trans… Read more →

World War II Romance Takes Flight: With Every Letter by Sarah Sundin

A confession: I am a fairly new romance reader. I only picked up my first true romance novel about a year ago. However, I grew up hearing a true story that could be straight out of a historical romance. My grandparents met and had a shipboard romance just after World War II as they served… Read more →

Celebrating the Fourth Age: Mapping Menopause with Curiosity and Love

Darcey Steinke’s Flash Count Diary: Menopause and the Vindication of Natural Life is a beautiful and complex book grappling with the experience of menopause. The author interweaves research with her personal experience. What is menopause? What should it be? From the deep discomforts of sleeplessness and hot flashes to her eventual landing place that one… Read more →

Containing Explosives: The Cold War Link between Bombs and Breasts

I don’t know that it’s possible to watch Mad Men without experiencing a healthy envy of Betty Draper’s flawless white, suburban housewife aesthetic. Produced by Matthew Weiner and created by Lionsgate Television, Mad Men (2007–15) brilliantly narrates the gripping Cold War story of mysterious executive Donald Draper and his colorful coworkers and acquaintances at an… Read more →

Assassination as Cure: Disease Metaphors and Foreign Policy

On January 3, 2020, I was at my mother’s house where CNN is her constant companion. A drone strike ordered by President Donald Trump had killed Iranian Major General Qassem Soleimani and nine others. I was horrified and wanted to hear the news, but I was only half-listening because I hate CNN’s so-called analysis and… Read more →

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news Charting pain in 1879. So you want to be a beatnik?  Documenting sex ed in queer bodies. Teen girls don’t need routine pelvic exams. What’s the deal with mail-in sperm start-ups? A year’s diary of reckoning with climate anxiety. How medieval surgeons shaped sex… Read more →