Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news I was Jane Doe once. Was Freud right about hysteria? Twitter is full of fake history photos. Medical uses of ice in the Civil War. Gender and labor in jellyfish husbandry. The life and death of a radical sisterhood. The feminist history of brown… Read more →

Sex on the Border: Policing Women in Red Light Districts

In 2001, a Dallas Observer reporter stepped into a shadowy, smoke-filled room and narrowed his eyes to see through the blinking neon lights and deconstruct the American traveler’s fascination with the modern sex industry along the border. The image he projected, of women lined up against a crumbling wall in a run down bar, tells… Read more →

Let’s Question All Versions of the Myth of Perfect Motherhood

I would call it a “pet peeve,” but the stakes are higher: I can’t stand policy arguments based on inaccurate or misrepresented historical facts. My latest peeve-trigger? Claire Howorth’s cover essay in Time magazine, critiquing “The Goddess Myth: How a Vision of Perfect Motherhood Hurts Moms.” Now, I agree with much of Howorth’s criticism of… Read more →

Fleas, Fleas, Fleas

In September, I turned on Democracy Now! and came into a story about the mass extinction of a third of the world’s parasites. Although I made sure that my response to the story included the morally and ethically correct alarm and horror, I must admit my initial response was relief. After all, parasites are, um,… Read more →

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news A herstory of lesbian bars in NYC. The stimulating history of sex tech. How Miss Millie taught the Civil War. The long, strange history of dieting fads. What rum and cokes have to do with war. How eggs may be hampering your flu vaccine…. Read more →

On Poverty, Morality, and Mothering

In 1930, nineteen-year-old black (preta) Jovelina Pereira dos Santos, a live-in domestic servant in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, hid her pregnancy from her family and employers, gave birth in secret, and asphyxiated her newborn immediately after delivery. Santos already had a young son named Ernesto who was a little over one year of age. Santos… Read more →

My Experiences with Auto-Immunity and Why I Dislike the Term “Able-Bodied”

I dislike the term “able-bodied.” I see this term used frequently in academic and activist scholarship, as well as everyday language, often without giving the term its due scrutiny. As an academic who studies structural inequalities based on race, gender, and disability, I find that it assumes a binary system structured on ableist ideas. It… Read more →

VD in the Archives

For something that played such a prevalent role in life at the front, sex and venereal disease (or VD) have been largely underrepresented thus far in the public remembrance of the centenary of the First World War. In 1916, one in five of all admissions of British and Allied troops to hospitals in France and… Read more →

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news Witchcraft in Canada. Telling menstrual tales. Better health through cannibalism. On Christopher Robin, war, and PTSD. The curious history of Lincoln’s birth cabin. Reading the Iliad during the 1980s AIDS crisis.  Why did so few novels tackle the 1918 pandemic? The invention and evolution of the… Read more →

The Cultural Logic of Calories and Body Types

We were promised calorie labels. New York City has required them in chain restaurants since 2008 and California since 2009, but the Affordable Care Act mandated them nationwide. In April 2016, the FDA issued a “final rule” on the calorie-labeling requirement, resolving questions like whether movie theaters and alcoholic beverages were included (they were), and… Read more →