Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news Nursing done in wild places. We can thank women for beer. What’s the definition of health? The Mental Patients Union, 1973. When televisions were radioactive. Drinking gold in 16th-century France. The true cost of the Louisiana Purchase. A history of restaurant food photography. Remembering… Read more →

Between War and Water: Saratoga Springs and Veteran Health after the First World War

One month and eight days before world leaders signed the Armistice to end the First World War, New York Governor Charles Whitman wrote to Surgeon General William Gorgas to ensure that his state would play a role in caring for America’s veterans. He advocated on behalf of Saratoga Springs, a vibrant city forty miles north… Read more →

Whose Milk? Changing US Attitudes toward Maternal Breastfeeding

In the spring of 2018, government delegates from around the world gathered in Geneva, Switzerland for the World Health Assembly in affiliation with the United Nations. Delegates from Ecuador introduced a resolution, outlining a policy supporting maternal breastfeeding and calling for better regulation of the marketing of breastmilk substitutes. Most delegates expected the resolution to… Read more →

“We’re Here As Women”: General Hospital, #MeToo, and the Power of Soap Operas

Split personalities and evil twins, secret babies and long-lost heirs. Soap operas provide us with stories of high drama and deep intrigue, contrasting scenes of familiar domestic life with a narrative tuned to the highest possible emotional frequency. Because they air every day, five days a week, fifty-two weeks a year, daytime soap operas are… Read more →

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news Slavery and fashion. Good animals, bad humans? Why do we pledge allegiance? How art embraced nakedness. The poetry of Victorian science. Victorians and their magic lanterns. When slavery is erased from plantations. Why don’t more boys read Little Women? “The Yellow Wallpaper” and women’s pain…. Read more →

At Your Service: The Role of the Historian in Contemporary Reproductive Rights Debates

A new wave of frenetic reproductive puritanism appears to be sweeping the globe. From Trump’s global gag, which has widely been heralded as a “devastating blow for women’s rights,” to the rollback of access to legal abortion in countries such as Chile, reproductive politics are defining administrative agendas. But in lamenting the state of current… Read more →

Adventures without Archives: Professors without Travel Funding

I am a professor teaching at a public teaching university in Grand Junction, Colorado. I love research and thinking about research. However, I am poor in both time and funding. Like others at similar institutions, I teach a 4/4 load with close to 150 students per semester and my institution does not allow us to… Read more →

Up in Flames: The Death of Brazil’s Museu Nacional

What do you do when your archive burns down? That’s a question that I, as well as thousands of researchers in Brazil and across the globe, faced on Sunday, September 2, when Brazil’s Museu Nacional (National Museum) in Rio de Janeiro went up in flames. The largest national history museum in Latin America, the Museu’s… Read more →

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news Finding Hope. A history of the clitoris. A brief history of the RV. The hiphop archive at Harvard. Spreading the news of yellow fever. The origin of the word “quarantine.” The long history of the genderless “they.” A short history of America’s “tamale wars.”… Read more →

A View from Inside the Suburban Mom Movement

Before 2016, conversations at school pickup time in my affluent suburb nearly always revolved around kids’ activities and home remodeling. We stayed away from political topics mostly; it seemed impolite to provoke a fellow PTO member.1 If anyone temporarily put up something as unaesthetic as a lawn sign amongst their manicured shrubs, it said something… Read more →