Jacqueline Antonovich

Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-Men looking for cat, find catacomb instead.
-10 historical (and awesome) facts about the Girl Scouts.
-Now boys are hitting puberty earlier too.
-Richard Burton’s very sexy diaries (and yes, a lot of it is about Liz).
-Very, very, very old socks.
-“Lilly of the Mohawks” officially becomes a Saint.

Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-The history of the fork is way more fascinating than you might think.
-The five most important places in history (according to one guy).
-Want to read Anne Frank’s Diary? There’s an app for that.
-Elderly are newest group to be plagued by eating disorders.
-The saddest letters you will ever read. Ever.
-Bioethicists raise concerns over personal genomes and privacy protections.

Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-Famous “race scientist” dies in Canada.
-The untold story of Korean eunuchs.
-FDR’s son was a hottie.
-Ever wondered what the Depression sounded like? Listen here!
-Could the drug, Special K, be the secret weapon in the fight against depression?
-Helen Keller’s handwritten story now digitized and available to the public.
-Another week, another archive in danger.

Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-Nazi-acquired Buddha statue came from space (Now there’s a headline I thought I’d never write).
-The best college prank ever happened in the 1790s (and involved bat poop).
-Bonnie and Clyde guns go up for auction.
-A short history of banning coffee.
-Mitt Romney’s campaign promise: No more Lyme Disease!

Sunday Morning Medicine

-Downton Abbey and medical quackery.
-Have you bought your Halloween menstrual pads yet?
-A photo collection of lesbians throughout history.
-Secret John F. Kennedy tapes released.
-Genome of Black Death reconstructed by scientists.
-The controversial history of food allergies.

There’s No Crying in the Archives!

By Jacqueline Antonovich

I remember my first time fondly. The year was 2010. It was a hot summer day in downtown Denver and I was excited, yet nervous. Would I know what to do? Would I be good at it? What if it was boring? Would I get to wear those cool white gloves? Ah yes, the first trip to the archives is always a special time in a grad student’s life (Hey – get your mind out of the gutter!). I was an MA student at the University of Wyoming and I had traveled down to the Colorado State Archives to do my thesis research on female juvenile delinquency in Progressive-Era Denver. On my way to the archives, I imagined what my first research experience would be like – perhaps I would be sitting in an old, dusty room with only an antique lamp to illuminate my precious manuscripts and documents. Maybe I would make friends with the elderly archivist, who would surely offer me a hot cup of tea. The possibilities were endless!

Sunday Morning Medicine

-New photograph of poet Emily Dickinson discovered.
-“Bullying, Masculinity, and the Spectre of the Fag.”
-Does breastfeeding cause droopy breasts? (thankfully, science has the answer.)
-Speaking of breasts . . . a breast washing machine circa 1930s!?
-Stock photographs of sad babies with their feminist mommies.
-Art, the brain, and neuroscience.

Sunday Morning Medicine

-Sex and polio in the movies.
-Your condoms are not made in Condom, France.
-Oldest message in a bottle found.
-Why abortion apologies hurt the pro-choice cause.
-Ancient Korean love letter unearthed.
-The dangers of deconstructing women.

Sunday Morning Medicine

-19th century beauty secrets revealed!
-The history of New York in 50 objects.
-When they were young – 30 famous historical figures.
-The controversy over the long-awaited Thalidomide apology.
-The gay artist who defined american masculinity in the early-20th century.
-Do we need to redefine the term “disability?”
-Mysterious new virus found in middle America.

Sunday Morning Medicine

The history of the “C Word.”
The G-Spot and junk science.
50 Shades of Grey book burnings.
Dishonoring Custer? Srsly!?
King Richard III may be buried under a parking lot.
The Japanese radical who spied on the Black Panthers.
Dr. Seuss’ colorful story about malaria.