Oscillating and Depreciating: Early Modern Spanish Views of Unsanctioned Female Healers

Antonio asks, “Do you believe that God will burn all of the sinners forever and ever when they die?” “Si,” replies his uncle Pedro as their old truck bumbles past a brothel where several women are hanging their laundry. While Antonio makes eye contact with one of the women hanging her clothes, he asks his… Read more →

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news When the waltz went solo. A year of intersex victories. Beware of vaccine euphoria. Witty, sexual – and menopausal. Emily Dickinson on spring break. How women lost status in saloons. COVID-19 vaccines and their metaphors. Ancient snack stall uncovered in Pompeii. The first Black… Read more →

Nursing Clio Presents Its Sixth Annual Best of List

2020 has been the worst of years, but the Nursing Clio staff still found a few things to enjoy. Favorite Book Laura Ansley: In times of stress, I reach for happy reading. And what’s more fitting than the guaranteed happily-ever-after of romance novels? Some of favorite reads in 2020 were Alexis Daria’s You Had Me… Read more →

Alone, Together: Memory and Death in a Pandemic

“You’re lucky, then, that your mom died before all this began,” my friend said. “At least you got to be there. At least you got a funeral.” However starkly her words hung between us, I knew she was right. As shattering as it was when my mom died in Tucson four days before my sister’s… Read more →

Black Before Florence: Black Nurses, Enslaved Labor, and the British Royal Navy, 1790–1820

Throughout the eighteenth century, the British Royal Navy embarked on a scheme of hospital construction in the Atlantic World. The largest hospitals were in the British Isles, but those that dealt with the highest mortality were in the Greater Caribbean. Most naval medical history focuses on male medical officers, while most nursing history examines the… Read more →

The Rejected Ones: Indian Foundlings in Colonial Portuguese Goa

In September of 1747, Rosa de Menezes went into labor in her home in the poorest quarter of Goa, the capital of Portuguese India.[1] Menezes, an Indian Christian widow, had fallen pregnant, in her own words, “due to the weakness of the human condition” (pela fragilidade de humana) – a euphemism for sex outside of… Read more →

Changing the Narrative: The Importance of Centering Choice

On September 14, Dawn Wooten, a former nurse at the Irwin County Detention Center in Ocilla, Georgia, filed a whistleblower complaint alleging there was a complete lack of protection against COVID-19. Wooten also testified that doctors at the center performed hysterectomies on detainees at alarmingly high rates. When speaking about one physician, Wooten stated, “everybody… Read more →

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news It’s time for a Latino museum. Mad dogs and bindweed cures. The deadly bilibid prison vaccine trials. How scientists use and abuse portraiture. How will we tell the story of coronavirus? Vaccine mistrust historic and rooted in injustice. “We have not yet forgiven Haiti… Read more →

Garbage Bags and Tomato Cans: The History of Nurses Making Basic Equipment Out of Trash

In spring 2020, images of nurses treating patients while wearing garbage bags instead of standard disposable gowns symbolized both the bravery of frontline clinicians and a shocking lack of preparation for the emerging COVID-19 pandemic. This clever use of a trash bag as well as other everyday items and actual trash to create ad-hoc personal… Read more →

A Perspective on Patienthood

“The patient.” I hate that term. I hate to write about “the patient,” I hate to talk about “the patient.” But before I proceed, let me take a moment to locate myself: I am a medical social worker, a therapist, and a chronic illness patient with SLE (lupus). A significant part of my job is… Read more →