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Not Your (Old, White) Father’s History

If you haven't already heard, the New York Times recently interviewed retired Princeton historian of the Civil War James McPherson for the newspaper’s “By the Book” feature. McPherson is a well-respected legend in the field, yet many historians were left scratching their collective heads over his responses to such questions as "Who are the best historians writing today?" and "What are the best books about African American history?" Suffice it to say, his answers seemed very white, very male, and well, very dated.

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When Whites Riot, Humanity is a Given

By Austin McCoy

Two weeks ago, hundreds of young whites clashed with riot police in Keene, NH, during the city's annual Pumpkin Festival. The details regarding the riot's spark are not clear. Witnesses describe the riot as a college party that spiraled out of control. Observers talked about how participants threw bottles and rocks, turned over dumpsters and a car, and uprooted traffic signs. The police responded in kind by firing tear gas and rubber bullets at rioters. Around thirty people were injured.

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Write for Nursing Clio!

The editors of Nursing Clio (www.nursingclio.org) welcome applications for new regular and guest bloggers for the site. The editors are especially looking for authors who write about the experiences of women of color and non-US topics. Interested authors should submit original essays of 800-1,500 words that include relevant hyperlinks as well as the author’s bio line, limited endnotes, and a list of further reading. Submissions should be accompanied by the author’s curriculum vitae or resume. Essays should be submitted as word documents (.doc or .docx), and authors should format according to the Nursing Clio Style Guide available on our website. All essays submitted to Nursing Clio are subjected to an open peer review process for content, style, and format. Authors should be sure that their essay is written in a voice suitable for blog publication and reflect the mission of Nursing Clio. Our editorial team welcomes essays based on a broad range of subjects and experiences, including original research, book reviews, memoirs, “Adventures in the Archives,” and other reflections. Submissions or inquiries should be sent to the editorial team at nursingclio@gmail.com

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The Secret to Girls’ Success (Think: Periods)

By Lara Freidenfelds

When you were 14, if you had your period, but your parents couldn’t buy you pads or tampons, would you have gone to school? It’s unimaginable, right? It would have been too gross and humiliating to even consider. Better to pretend to be sick, and deal with the missed work and the bad grades.

In many parts of the world, that’s exactly what happens. And that means that girls don’t get educated, even where they have access to schools.

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Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-The pirates of Lake Michigan.
-The 16th-century dance plague.
-Down Syndrome isn't just cute.
-A history of blood transfusions.
-The "headhunters" of Coney Island.
-Help preserve history in just one click.

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A Short History of the Penis, Masculinity, and American Feminism

By Lauren MacIvor Thompson

If you haven't heard of Claire Wyckoff, the San Francisco woman who copywrites by day for a global advertising firm and in her spare time maps runs that look like penises (or other stuff) around town using the NikePlus app, head over to her Tumblr right now. Seriously, right now. We'll wait.

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Adventures in the Archives: Living in a Material World

By Jacqueline Antonovich

A wise woman once remarked, “We are living in a material world and I am a material girl.” And while this ode to consumption may have been referring to the procurement and enjoyment of luxury items, I think Madonna may have been on to something – though perhaps not in the way she intended. You see, over this past summer I had an unintentional, but deeply meaningful, love affair with . . . material culture.

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The Body as Archive

By Andrea Milne

Trying to become a public historian and freelance writer in grad school is requiring me to walk a difficult tightrope. I want to be as authentic as humanly possible, but I'm also a professor-in-training; I don't want to put anything out into the world that I would have trouble explaining to a hiring committee, to my colleagues, or to my students. As a result, I often find myself debating the merits of a post. The problem with this particular brand of censorship is that it's entirely too fuzzy. I haven't articulated to myself what constitutes fair game. How personal do I want to get? How personal do I need to get? That's why, on August 28 -- after much hemming and hawing -- I ultimately decided to write about a medical procedure I was about to undergo. I want to live in a world where academics living with disabilities aren't afraid to "come out" for fear of the cultural and institutional ableism to which it would expose them. Telling my own story is a risky, but necessary, step in that process.

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Women in Tech from ENIAC to MOM

By Adam Turner

On September 24, as I enjoyed my second coffee of the morning and caught up on news, a photo caught my eye. In the image, women in colorful saris congratulated each other amidst massive computer monitors. The exuberance of the photo arrested me -- as did the obvious techy setting, nerd that I am -- but, sadly, what really drew my attention was the fact that these women seemed … out of place. And I wasn't the only one drawn in by this image. The photo, snapped by AFP photographer Manjunath Kiran, quickly made the rounds on news outlets and social media.

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Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-The midwives of St. Croix.
-Male midwives of Ethiopia.
-America's coolest ghost towns.
-Does cancer spread while you sleep?
-Life in a 1930s psychiatric hospital.

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