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Worlds of Rape, Words of Rape

By Sharon Block

Stories of rape again fill the news. Rolling Stone featured an article by Sabrina Rubin Erdely about University of Virginia's responses to rape at a fraternity party. The resurrected history of Bill Cosby's sexual assaults on women has dominated headlines. Of course, October also had campus rape news: Columbia University student Emma Sulkewicz' "Carry that Weight Project" brought national attention to colleges' woefully inadequate responses to sexual assault. Come to think of it: in 2013 we heard plenty about disbelieving judges and police reticence to take student rape seriously. 2012? Let's just call it the year of Republicans and Rape and move on.

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Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-Practicing narrative medicine.
-When Thanksgiving was weird.
-How do you memorialize a mob?
-Theories of the first topsy-turvy dolls.
-A November feast in medieval Europe.
-The ethics of healthcare worker strikes.

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Motherhood, Expanded

By Rachel Epp Buller

I was a senior in high school when Vice President Dan Quayle delivered his soon-to-be-infamous diatribe against Murphy Brown while on the campaign trail. Quayle was supposed to be addressing the Los Angeles race riots, but along the way he ended up blaming single mothers for a decline in social values and blasting Candice Bergen's fictional TV character for glorifying single motherhood as “just another lifestyle choice.”[1] Although the speech was viewed at the time as a political gaffe, Quayle and then-President Bush capitalized on the media frenzy to politicize the notion of “family values.” They sought to convey to voters that motherhood should be confined to the institution of heterosexual marriage; morally questionable single mothers endangered both the welfare of children and society as a whole. In the years since Quayle's speech, journalists, sociologists, and historians have continued to write about the Murphy Brown incident.[2] Some argue that Quayle's stance has proven prophetic and that single mothers do indeed wreak havoc on the social fabric.[3]

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Tuning In for Public Health: The Promise of Televised Health Education in 1950s America

By Meggan Woodbury Bilotte

During a recent well-child check up, the nurse asked how much television my son watched. Although not common a generation ago, this question is now part of the routine examination. Along with asking about our kids' diets and daily exercise, we are also asked about their television viewing habits. There seems to be a general consensus among 21st century American health practitioners that TV, at least too much of it, is bad for your health. History loves irony, however, and those who now caution against too much television, health professionals, once saw it as an exciting and important new medium. Beginning in the 1950s, many health advocates perceived television as a way of using technology for widespread health education. So promising was this new mass media that one health advocate wondered if public health agencies could “afford not to consider using TV as a medium for disseminating health information to the public.”

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Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-The strange dating games of 1914.
-The evolution of the doctor's office.
-The men who built the Berlin Wall.
-Dress designs lost in the Holocaust.
-Are your medical records top secret?
-How Kodak set the skin-tone standard.

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“This is our Freedom Summer”:  My Reflections on #FergusonOctober

By Austin McCoy

My decision to participate in Ferguson October was spur of the moment. I did not plan to attend, but my partner and her roommate convinced me to go. My interconnected multiple selves -- black man, job-seeking graduate student, and activist committed to social justice -- waged a battle for my conscience and time. My multiple deadlines and obligations as a graduate student made such a trip inconvenient. Yet, I recalled my reaction to the George Zimmerman verdict. I remembered crying to express my helplessness and grief. I told myself that night, I would not be caught on the sidelines in the fight for racial justice again. I promised that I would do anything in my power to be present the next time, because, unfortunately, I knew there would be a next time.

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I’m a Country Girl … Or Not

By Sarah Handley-Cousins

I have a confession: I love country music. I grew up in a small town that could have come straight out of a country song, with its one stoplight, large number of cows, and self-described "redneck" residents. Country music was, unsurprisingly, pretty popular. I stopped listening to country for quite awhile after I left home, until a friend took me to a Zac Brown Band concert -- after that, I was hooked. My Pandora stations all had titles like “Today's Country Radio" and “Country Love Songs Radio.” I even bought cowboy boots. One day while singing along to Florida Georgia Line's incredibly popular “Cruise,” I found myself thinking, “Man, I want to be this girl.”

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Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-Historiography via Ebony.
-The rise and rise of sexology.
-A brief history of the tampon.
-Video chatting with Communists.
-A history of religion and cosmetics.

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Not Done Yet: Midwifing a Return to Social Birth

By Jordan Taitel

As a doula, I have the privilege of attending other women's labors and deliveries. Recently I attended a delivery assisted by a midwife at a large-scale hospital. The midwife and the nursing staff supported the fearless mama as she labored away in a large room with a wall of windows looking out on a beautiful river. The room was decorated with pretty pictures of flowers and soothing paint tones. Most of the medical equipment remained hidden in easy-access drawers. Everything in this beautiful birthing suite was designed to make it feel more like home for the women who would deliver there. As a student of medical history, I felt thankful for the room's design because it was a far cry from the maternity wards of the 1950s and 1960s. This hospital did everything it could to create a comfortable, personalized, and supportive environment. Still, it was a hospital, and the presence of medical intervention was inescapable. From the constant rise and fall of the heart monitors to the list of restrictions so complex that I was required to call for a nurse every time the patient wanted food, this was an environment controlled by the medical field.

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A Letter and the Legacy of “Not White” in the USA

By Adam Turner

With the events of the past months, and as Austin McCoy discussed here on Nursing Clio last week, it should be clear that white privilege is still alive and well in the United States. Despite the optimism following President Obama's election six years ago, and the Republican Party's tweets, we do not yet live in a society where the color of your skin doesn't matter. To make matters worse, while the discussion should be about how best to fix the problems of racial injustice and economic oppression in the United States, substantial numbers of people refuse to even accept that it's a problem. They prefer to believe that those who suffer from systemic poverty, police violence, and a biased justice system get only what they've earned by being lazy, or breaking the law, or acting badly.

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