Tag: Violence

#Niunamenos (#Notoneless): Gendered Violence in Latin America

In a July response to a recent series of public protests decrying violence against women, Argentine President Mauricio Macri introduced a national plan to end the country’s high rates of gender violence. In addition to funding battered women’s shelters and telephone hotlines, Argentina will introduce gender violence awareness in school curricula. As Macri stated, ending… Read more →

El Chapo, Sean Penn, and the Violence of Celebrity

Well Rolling Stone, you’ve done it again. Your feigned naiveté combined with your lack of journalistic integrity has propelled you onto the front page of other, legitimate news sources. In case you haven’t heard about it yet, Sean Penn, with the help of Mexican telenovela actress Kate del Castillo, interviewed the most notorious drug kingpin… Read more →

Love, Death, and Human Rights: A View from Rio de Janeiro

My partner Clayton was murdered while riding his motorcycle home from work on April 28, 2015. He was followed by three men on two motorcycles who opened fire with a semi-automatic weapon and shot him nearly 20 times in the back. Clayton was a police officer in the favela of Manguinhos, an urban slum in… Read more →

I Was a Bystander in a Police Shooting: What It Taught Me about Police Violence, Memory, and Public Trust

I was returning from a productive, fun academic conference in Tampa, Florida last March, getting in on a 7:35 flight to the Southwest terminal in the New Orleans airport. While I had enjoyed the conference, I was incredibly happy to be coming home to my husband and four-year-old daughter, her souvenirs, or “souvers” as she… Read more →

Reauthorizing VAWA: Now, Was That So Hard?

By Ashley Baggett

About damn time! Despite its bi-partisan support from its inception in 1994, the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) lapsed in 2012. Republicans and Democrats engaged in an intense debate on the terms of the bill as did the rest of the country. But on February 28, 2013, the House of Representatives renewed it. Not the watered down one. They passed the all-inclusive VAWA that provides resources for Native American, immigrant, and LGBT victims. Now we can continue the fight against domestic violence without regressing decades in the larger campaign for women’s rights. While most agree much more has to be done to end the violence, governmental intervention through VAWA is crucial to solving the problem.