Tag: Books

Who Was the Original “Welfare Queen?”: Review of Josh Levin’s The Queen: The Forgotten Life Behind an American Myth

How do you tell a story about a real-life, embodied individual who inspired a stereotype, without reducing her life to fit into the same trope you are trying to upend? How do you uncover the exception that proved the rule without reifying the label you acknowledge is pernicious? I’m not sure, and Josh Levin sure… Read more →

Nursing Clio Presents Its Third Annual Best Of List

Let’s face it, we all knew 2017 was going to be a garbage fire. But in between the political nightmares, nazis, and general terribleness, there were moments in 2017 that gave us life. Nursing Clio presents its third annual Best Of list. Favorite Book Laura Ansley: I can never pick just one. But favorite fiction this year… Read more →

A Historian’s Trip to the Graveyard

bardo, noun (In Tibetan Buddhism) a state of existence between death and rebirth, varying in length according to a person’s conduct in life and manner of, or age at, death. Origin: Tibetan bár-do, from bar “interval” + do “two.”1 For someone who spends their time obsessing over history, I don’t read much historical fiction. Given… Read more →

Almost Fourteen: The Book That Stopped Me in My Research Tracks

One of the things I always warn people about before their first archival trip is just how boring historical research can be. We sit for days in silent archives, flipping through folders of papers, hoping to find little tidbits that we can build into a cohesive narrative about the past. (Thank goodness for the invention… Read more →

Quinine, Magic Pollen, and the British Empire in Fiction

Hands down, my favorite book of 2016 (and possibly ever) was The Watchmaker of Filigree Street. I read it with my Dessert Book Club, and every member either loved it or found some degree of enjoyment in it.1 And believe me — in the DBC, our tastes vary greatly, and it is rare that we… Read more →

Option Whatever: The Corporatization of Grief in Sheryl Sandberg’s Option B

Two years ago, my husband Clayton was murdered. That summer, I wrote a lot in my journal. I felt angry at how so many people reacted to Clayton’s death. I wanted to memorialize our memories together. I wanted to remember through writing. I snarkily told my family I was going to publish my own how-to… Read more →

Best of 2016

Let’s face it, 2016 was a dumpster fire and we’re glad to see it die a fiery death. But in between the political cataclysms, celebrity deaths, and general terribleness, there were moments in 2016 that gave us life. Nursing Clio presents its second annual Best Of list. Favorite Book Laura Ansley: I read a lot… Read more →

Clio Reads: A Review of It Hurts Down There: The Bodily Imaginaries Of Female Genital Pain

“Female genital pain” is an umbrella term that encompasses a range of often miserable, frequently perplexing conditions that render women’s genitals, external or internal or both, a zone of persistent, intransigent pain. Yet the names physicians have given these conditions are indicative of little more than their primary symptoms: “vulvodynia,” perhaps the most common diagnosis,… Read more →

Nursing Clio’s Best of 2015!

With acknowledgments to our friends at Tropics of Meta who thought of the idea first, here are Nursing Clio’s “best of” the year. Favorite Book Lauren MacIvor Thompson I got nothin’. #dissertationproblems Lara Freidenfelds Shaping Our Selves: On Technology, Flourishing, and a Habit of Thinking, by Erik Parens. Parens is wise, humble, insightful, and pleasingly… Read more →

Clio Reads: A Review of Feminism Unfinished

In Feminism Unfinished: A Short, Surprising History of American Women’s Movements, historians Dorothy Sue Cobble, Linda Gordon, and Astrid Henry survey the women’s movement from 1920 to the present. That periodization might be, as their title suggests, surprising to some readers, since “the” women’s movement is primarily associated with the 1960s and 1970s. But Cobble,… Read more →