Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news Secrets of a brothel privy. Susan B. Anthony’s bad food. A woman on Mount Rushmore? The history of the “ideal” woman. Lena Dunham’s lesson for doctors. Why black disability history matters. Walking in Harriet Tubman’s footsteps. Key concepts and research in bioethics. Women’s Experiences… Read more →

Climate Calamity: Lice, Typhus, and Gender in Mexico

By tucking themselves away in the corners of beds and the folds of clothes, insects have long evolved alongside humans. Mites, ticks, fleas, bedbugs, lice—they all feast happily on blood, leaving humans with the itchy, irritating aftermath. In the first half of the twentieth century, rural parasitic insects gained a foothold in the largely agriculture-based… Read more →

Community Food Justice: An Interview with Garrett Broad

We think and write about justice issues a lot here at Nursing Clio: social justice, reproductive justice, criminal justice, and environmental justice, to name just a few. As our blog’s resident food historian, I think a lot about food justice, which aims to promote a fair and equitable food system for all, but most particularly… Read more →

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news A history of the “ditz” voice. Menstruating while disabled. Vintage posters of strong women. The vaccine that changed the world. The illnesses and death of Queen Mary I. Super Spooner and the Witchcraft murder. The story of the skull found in a London pub…. Read more →

Poison and Protest: Sarah Bassett and Enslaved Women Poisoners in the Early Modern Caribbean

In 2008, the government of Bermuda erected its very first monument to an enslaved person. The “Sally Bassett Memorial Statue” is a ten-foot tall bronze sculpture by Bermudian artist Carlos Dowling. It depicts Sarah Bassett, an enslaved woman who was executed in 1730 for poisoning three people. Bassett is a well-known figure to Bermudians, and… Read more →

The Devastation of Peace: Otilia Noeckel and the Army Nurse Corps after the Great War

“I just adore the work I am doing right now. I am on a dressing team with another nurse and a surgeon. We dress wounds almost all day long. Today we did sixty. The horrors of the war are certainly evident around here. Some of the wounds are frightful and some of the poor boys… Read more →

Gilded Age Decadence and Decay: A Review of The Alienist

I’ve been pretty excited about the coming of TNT’s adaptation of Caleb Carr’s The Alienist since the announcement last summer. I read the book – and hated it – last year with my book club. That discussion was a fun one, because we love to hate a book. Our biggest qualm was that the author… Read more →

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news Under Victorian microscopes. When poop becomes medicine. The racist history of crisis actors. When London pubs were full at 7 AM. The feminist history of the French fairy tale. Human bones could belong to infamous pirate. The history and future of feminist resistance in… Read more →

Health Care in Colonial Peruvian Convents

Last May I had the opportunity to conduct archival research in Arequipa, Peru. I went in search of fodder for my new research project on health and healing in colonial Latin American convents. I was not disappointed because not only did I find a bundle of fascinating documents, but I also got to ramble the… Read more →

The Weight of the Presidency

In early January, President Trump had a physical exam at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, a periodic rite for US presidents in the modern era. The results were made public a few days later, with fevered public interest from popular media and television commentators. Was the President, with a height/weight ratio that put his BMI… Read more →