Mothers’ Natures: Sex, Love, and Degeneration in the Nineteenth-Century United States

Every so often, some viral article or other will declare that science “proves” or “confirms” that intelligence is inherited from mothers. (I know, because my own mother will promptly share it on Facebook.) Swiftly, of course, revisionary articles will appear correcting or debunking this claim, chastising armchair geneticists for their overly-simplistic understandings of the X-chromosome…. Read more →

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news The price of fashion in 1910. A reconstructed Auschwitz letter. Mary Webster survives a hanging. Who owns Marsha P. Johnson’s story? Cholera remedies in the mid-19th century. Century-old vial sheds light on first vaccine. The women artists on the London Underground. Tracing the life… Read more →

The Enigmatic Spinster

Judging from the number of books, blogs, news articles and interviews focused on the lives of single women, it seems that the “spinster” is making a resurgence. For example, Rebecca Traister’s All the Single Ladies: Unmarried Women and the Rise of an Independent Nation and Kate Bolick’s Spinster: Making a Life of One’s Own received… Read more →

The Second Sentence: AIDS in Dublin’s Mountjoy Prison

In January 1986, Irish current affairs program Today Tonight reported on a spate of deaths and attempted suicides in Dublin’s Mountjoy prison. These, the reporter intoned, “reveal something seriously wrong in the Irish prison system. A system long-known to be overstretched, antiquated and inadequate has been pushed into the front line of modern Irish society’s… Read more →

Buried Secrets, Living Children: Secrecy, Shame, and Sealed Adoption Records

Between 1945 and 1973, single mothers in the United States gave birth in an era of secrecy and shame that historians of adoption call the Baby Scoop Era (BSE).1 During this time, millions of unwed mothers gave birth to children who they often unwillingly relinquished for adoption. Although precise numbers are elusive, as many as… Read more →

My Story of 20 Weeks

20 weeks. That is the magic number according to the GOP. House Republicans last week passed a bill, which they named the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act, banning abortions after 20 weeks except in cases of rape or incest, or when necessary to save the life of the mother. While not expected to pass the… Read more →

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news Pandemic windows. The making of a male midwife. Who was the woman in white? The doughnut heroines of wartime. A short history of queer love letters. Sex, swimming, and Chicago’s racial divide. The speculum finally gets a modern redesign. What can cemeteries teach us… Read more →

Our Favorite Podcasts

  This week, we brought you interviews with the historians behind two new history podcasts, Dig and Sexing History. Today we polled our editors and writers: what are you listening to?  What is your favorite history podcast? Averill Earls: For indie podcasts, obviously Dig: A History Podcast. For people who get paid to podcast, Stuff You Missed in… Read more →

Talking Sexing History

Averill Earls: Welcome to the wide and wonderful world of podcasting, Sexing History! Gillian Frank and Lauren Gutterman: Thanks so much! AE: Long time fan, first time interviewer. You both know I am a big fan of your digital and traditional history work, and I am psyched about your podcast. What inspired you to launch… Read more →

Meet the Lady Historians of DIG

It’s Podcast Week here at Nursing Clio! This week we will be talking to the producers of two new history podcasts, Sexing History and DIG: A History Podcast. We will also share our own must-listen picks. So whether you’re an avid podcast fan or just thinking about exploring the genre, we’ve got you covered. To… Read more →