Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news No rest. Past vaccine disasters. The history of Slim Jims. Black aging matters, too. The oldest cookbook in Korea. The real story of Black anarchists. The history of Black college football. Remember punk rock? Probably not. I’m so bored with the Lost Colonists. The… Read more →

Hygeia: Women in the Cemetery Landscape

We’ve all seen her. Hunched over the grave of an important poet. Standing meekly atop deceased philosophers, businessmen, and writers alike – head in hands and despairing. The Mourning Woman is a motif found throughout nineteenth-century Western cemeteries. She emerged during a revival of classical symbolism in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century gravestone iconography. She draws inspiration… Read more →

Motherhood, Undone: A Review of Belabored: A Vindication of the Rights of Pregnant Women by Lyz Lenz

One evening in early April, after yet another day of sending my toddler daughter to “Frozen school” while I attempted to work from home, I found myself in the woodshed, chucking pieces of firewood into the wall. I had wandered through to put the dogs out and when a few pieces fell dangerously close to… Read more →

Artificial Wombs and Decriminalizing Abortion

After the announcement of the successful animal trials of a partial artificial womb in 2017, an image of a tiny pink lamb fetus floating in a transparent bag briefly became ubiquitous.1 Mortality and health complications for premature babies born before 28 weeks remain high, in large part because their fragile lungs have not yet developed… Read more →

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news Dear Sirs. Fear of a Black planet. Many Tulsa massacres. Russia’s California colony. Come on and zoom-zoom. On Black Power in the Pacific. Reversing the psychiatric gaze. Can voting stop global warming? Crowd-sourcing a story of a people. “Bad dads” and the policing of… Read more →

The Collective Power of Our Abortion Stories

“I had an abortion in 1999.” So begins Annie Finch’s important new anthology, Choice Words: Writers on Abortion, about the representation of abortion across literary genres. After her abortion, Finch searched to find depictions of the procedure in literature to make sense of her experience and was surprised to learn that no major collection existed…. Read more →

The Politics of Method: An Interview with Henry Cowles

“The scientific method does not exist. But ‘the scientific method’ does.” So begins Henry M. Cowles’s new book The Scientific Method: An Evolution of Thinking from Darwin to Dewey about the very idea that science could be reduced to a single set of steps. Cowles argues that appeals to such a method – “shared across… Read more →

Breastfeeding During War

The fireworks began at 7 pm, and my anxiety, already made worse by sleep deprivation, was heightened. I had just returned home with my newborn from a traumatic birth experience, and we were struggling to learn to breastfeed and find a sleeping pattern. That evening, after a lot of fuss, I had finally put her… Read more →

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news Did my grandmother vote? Most museum docents are white. Plague and protest go hand in hand. Cocaine and Canada in the early 1970s. “Pie for a suffragist’s doubting husband.” The intersections of Blackness and disability. A food historian’s “ode to macaroni and cheese.” A… Read more →

Burying the Dead, and Then Digging Them Up

About a week after my partner Clayton was murdered in 2015, I went back to his gravesite with one of his brothers to visit. The cemetery, located in the suburbs of Rio de Janeiro, was a peaceful place, with expansive lawns and even some trees that afforded much-needed shade near Clayton’s burial site. Clayton’s headstone… Read more →