Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news Herpes in space! Waitresses in 1916. London’s sewer king. Queering the catalogue. Women’s periods in the 1920s. The case for public sex classes. After the miscarriage comes the bills. American art during the Vietnam War. The stress of racism is killing our babies. A… Read more →

Mad Libs: A Guide to (White) Women’s History Month

From high school textbooks, we all learned about  famous woman’s name  who is known as the mother of  traditionally masculine discipline . But, few have heard of  not famous woman’s name , an intrepid, fearless, tenacious woman who historians consider the grandmother of  closely related traditionally masculine discipline , paving the way for millions of future women in… Read more →

Understanding Trauma in the Civil War South: A Conversation with Diane Miller Sommerville

As I’ve written about for Nursing Clio previously, there’s been much debate in recent years about so-called ‘dark’ Civil War history. In that debate, Diane Miller Sommerville has been a vocal advocate for increased attention to the physical and psychological trauma wrought by the war. Her new book, An Aberration of Mind: Suicide and Suffering… Read more →

How to Do It: Sex Education and the “Sex Life”

In 1696, in Somerset county in southwest England, a schoolboy named John Cannon and his friends took their lunchtime break on the banks of a river near their schoolhouse. Unlike other uneventful riverside lunches, though, this day was memorable enough for Cannon to record in his memoirs. An older boy who was “about 17” years… Read more →

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news The history of Women’s History Month. The failed Soviet rival to the flapper dress. The mystery of the 1957 gay wedding photos. The historical significance of black queer films. How fashion forensics are helping solve crimes. Is testing the DNA in museum artifacts worth… Read more →

The Lady with the Alligator Purse

A Tisket a Tasket, Three Little Fishies, Baa Baa Black Sheep — these nursery rhymes were an integral part of my childhood experience. The rhyme that most captured my attention when I was a child, however, was Miss Lucy Had a Baby: Particularly fascinating to me were not the presence of the nurse, doctor, or… Read more →

Mange, Morphine, and Deadly Disease: Medicine and Public Health in Red Dead Redemption 2

Spoiler warning: This essay discusses major plot points about the ending of Red Dead Redemption 2. It’s dead midnight, there’s moonlight on the corn, and Thomas Downes owes me money. He protests he doesn’t have anything to spare, but I insist he does, and so we end up wrestling against the wood fence. Then, bruised… Read more →

Teaching Abélard and Héloïse

One of the wearying inevitabilities of 2018 was that even the most cursory glance at the news was likely to bring you a fresh tale of sexual assault — in politics, the entertainment industry and, closer to home for me, academia. Much of the resulting commentary was almost as jarring as the news articles themselves…. Read more →

At the Crossroads of Comfort TV and Comfort Food

When I started my PhD, a kind mentor advised me to cope with graduate school’s stresses by eating chocolate and watching lots of TV. I received the same guidance when starting a tenure track position, though the recommendation escalated to watching TV in a (forgivable and deserved) prostrate position. This is survival advice for everyone,… Read more →

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news Gin, syphilis, and lunacy. A history of the wheelchair. Why we need more black doulas. Teaching “Car Talk” to new docs. Viking women, at home and at war. Fairy tales may be older than we think. The real doctors who inspired M*A*S*H. The camera… Read more →