Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news A history of women fighting wildfires. Was the real Lone Ranger a black man? Collecting data about tuberculosis in 1900. The court case that killed the “ladies menu.” When women channeled the dead to be heard. The true story of Waco is still one… Read more →

Not a Day for Salads: The Football Food Rules of the Super Bowl

Super Bowl LII will soon be upon us, along with its super-sized spread of snacks, an American meal as iconic as Thanksgiving. Matching debates over what to serve on the fourth Thursday in November, food rules guide what supposedly pairs perfectly with the nation’s favorite sport. Super Bowl party menus most often include foods like… Read more →

Women’s Health Advocacy at Work

I realized belatedly that writing a biography of a women’s health activist as my dissertation (and wrestling with the late journalist Barbara Seaman’s strong personality) was an exhausting task. I finished graduate school a semester late, burnt out, and in desperate need of a paycheck. So when I saw a job advertisement from a women’s… Read more →

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news Tiny houses, narrow visions. Have you seen this punchbowl? Remembering the black radical press. Michelangelo’s grocery list is beautiful. The mysterious murder of Florrie Little. When mass murder is an intimate affair. The raw water craze might be a bad idea. A history of… Read more →

Fighting Back Over Leaning In: HBO’s Big Little Lies as a Lesson in Feminist Solidarity

As powerful men continue to fall in the wake of the viral #metoo movement, and as it has evolved into #TheirTimeIsUp, women are asking how to move forward in order to create a different world. I keep coming back to the critical possibilities of HBO’s Emmy and Golden Globe winning miniseries Big Little Lies. Single,… Read more →

Catholic Women, “Family Values,” and Republican Politics: An Interview with Stacie Taranto

I recently sat down with Stacie Taranto to discuss her new book, Kitchen Table Politics: Conservative Women and Family Values in New York. The book is a case study of New York State politics in the 1970s that shows how conservative “family values” rhetoric and policies became ascendant in the Republican Party. Taranto focuses on… Read more →

Judy Blume with a Potty Mouth: A Review of Netflix’s Big Mouth

A sex education video plays to a class of middle school students. “As puberty begins, hormones are released and the sexual organs begin to change. The uterus is the center of female reproductive activity….” Two boys, quietly, in the back of the room: “The uterus? I thought girls had vaginas?” “I thought that too, but… Read more →

Sunday Morning Medicine

A weekly check-up of gender, medicine, and history in the news Radical jugs? Afterlife of a factory. A 1907 multicultural vision test. Michel Foucault and Miley Cyrus. Meet TV’s first black lesbian superhero. Historians and government shutdowns. The secret sexual history of the barre workout. How the Spanish flu affected on American town. Teenage feminism… Read more →

The Freshman Fifteen: A Stigmatized Phenomenon

Seventeen magazine popularized the phrase “freshman fifteen” in 1989 and the phrase remains ubiquitous in U.S. culture today.1 Seventeen’s cover story “Fighting the Freshman 15” depicted the inevitable weight gain as an uphill, hopeless battle. The so-called “freshman fifteen” fostered a legendary nervous epidemic amongst students, especially women, entering their first year of college. How… Read more →

Take a Hay Ride: Remembering Louise Hay

On August 30, 2017, Louise Hay died. Hay was a metaphysical healer who began her journey in healing at the First Church of Religious Science in the late 1960s. Her first publication was a 1976 pamphlet that came to be called, “Heal Your Body.” She became a best-selling author and publisher in the 1980s in… Read more →