Nursing Clio is an open access, peer-reviewed, collaborative blog project that ties historical scholarship to present-day issues related to gender and medicine. Bodies, reproductive rights, and health care are often at the center of social, cultural, and political debates. We believe the issues that dominate today’s headlines and affect our daily lives reach far back into the past — that the personal is historical.

The mission of Nursing Clio is to provide a platform for historians, health care workers, community activists, students, and the public at large to engage in socio-political and cultural critiques of this ongoing and historical dialogue regarding the gendered body, the history of medicine, popular culture, current events, and other issues that catch our attention. Nursing Clio provides a coherent, intelligent, informative, and fun historical source for the consideration of these topics.

The Editorial Team

Find bios for the Editors and all of Nursing Clio’s fabulous writers on the Meet the Team page.

Jacqueline Antonovich

Executive Editor

Adam Turner

Layout Editor, Developer

Carrie Adkins

Managing Editor

Elizabeth Reis

Content Editor

Nursing Clio?

Why the name “Nursing Clio”? We’re so glad you asked.

In Greek mythology, Clio is the Muse of History. She is one of nine daughters born to Mnemosyne and Zeus.

So, Nursing Clio is meant as a double entendre — Nursing, as in the medical profession, and nursing in the way that mothers nurse their children.



Nursing Clio is a gathering site for historians, health care workers, community activists, students, and the public at large to engage in discussion of current and historical debates over medicine and the gendered body. Nursing Clio is in no way meant as a site for health advice or medical diagnoses. Please consult with your doctor (not historians) for sound, practical, and accurate medical advice.


Each Nursing Clio writer is an independent contributor to the blog and opinions expressed by each author are solely their own and are not necessarily shared by the rest of the contributors.


While we at Nursing Clio value the free exchange of ideas and opinions, we reserve the right to edit or delete comments that are abusive, absurd, irrelevant, or nonsensical in a manner that negatively affects other people. We require that posted comments meet our standard for civil discourse. As in the salons of previous centuries, boorish or blatantly self-promotional behavior will not be excused.