Category: Features

The Rise of ADHD

Are you easily distracted? Forget where you left your phone or your keys? Do you struggle with time management or organization? Not really as “detail-oriented” as your resume suggests? Do your friends tell you that it doesn’t really seem like you’re listening to them when they’re speaking? Has this been going on longer than six… Read more →

Bonding the Racial Gap in Oral Health and Care

The American healthcare system has long impacted people of color disproportionately, providing them with second-rate care that, in itself, is difficult to access. An area of healthcare that is often neglected where these disparities have existed for decades is dental care. This has contributed to prominent racial disparities in oral health that can begin early… Read more →

A Year of Personal Growth: My First Year with Hearing Loss

Growth is not always linear. My onset of unilateral idiopathic sensorineural hearing loss (also known as sudden, one-sided inner-ear hearing loss) has reminded me constantly about this. At times, this condition has forced me to pause and take a break. I have gained a disability, but I have also acquired a new identity – one… Read more →

15 Seconds to Illness: How TikTok is Contributing to an Eating Disorder Epidemic

Today, the idea that social media has a great effect on mental health is hardly a revelation. As more individuals join these social networks and harmful content becomes easier and easier to disguise, the number of affected children and teens continues to grow. In particular, new social media networks such as TikTok have contributed to… Read more →

The Case for Full Bodily Autonomy in Adolescent Reproductive Health Care

Are adolescents mature enough to make their own decisions when it comes to their medical care? If so, should those decisions be kept confidential from the adolescent’s parents or guardians? When it comes to answering this question, the lines are blurred. Thus far, public policy in the United States says both yes and no, with… Read more →

The Forgotten: Adults with Developmental Disabilities During COVID-19

“It’s time to put on hand sanitizer, Beth*,” I say as we get back in the car after visiting the park to see the ducks, or as she calls them, “QUACK QUACKS.” I reach for her hand and when the sanitizer touches her skin, she recoils. “Don’t you try! Don’t you try!” Beth exclaims, pulling… Read more →

Saving the Children: Is International Adoption Really the Answer?

The year 2021 marks thirty years since the United States first issued immigrant visas to Chinese orphans, signaling the beginning of international adoptions between the United States and China. As a 21-year-old Chinese adoptee, I have encountered plenty of people telling me how lucky and grateful I should feel regarding my adoption. But despite the… Read more →

Death by Proxy: What Twentieth-Century Infant Mortality Discourses in Brazil Can Tell Us About COVID-19

When the global death toll of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic surpassed one million in late September, the United States and Brazil registered the world’s two highest death counts. In the wake of this grim milestone, media outlets in both countries circulated various analogies to make sense of the scale of human loss. In Brazil, one… Read more →

Alone, Together: Memory and Death in a Pandemic

“You’re lucky, then, that your mom died before all this began,” my friend said. “At least you got to be there. At least you got a funeral.” However starkly her words hung between us, I knew she was right. As shattering as it was when my mom died in Tucson four days before my sister’s… Read more →

Rethinking Women, Gender, and War: A Feminist Approach

These four pathbreaking essays provide new insights into the role of women and war in military history. They pay particular attention to the impact of gendered assumptions on military practices and institutions in various sites and times around the world. Natalie Shibley highlights the difficulties women have fitting into the military, whether dealing with inappropriate… Read more →