Tag: science

Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-Japan may un-apologize to WWII “comfort women.”
-Meet the perfect woman circa 1912.
-MythBusting the corset.
-New Zealand’s weirdest archival secrets.
-An imperial tomb too deadly to explore?
-Jack Klugman’s unheralded role in America’s medical history.

Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-What’s in your belly button? (Hint: ewww…gross.)
-The forgotten history of 20th century drugs.
-The history of female genital mutilation.
-The nautical roots of the modern tattoo.
-The troubled history behind the stolen babies of Spain.
-1860s fundraising efforts for emancipated slaves.

Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-A new reality show will shame women who had abortions.
-Where are all the female geniuses?
-7 ways women are sexualized, stereotyped, or underrepresented in media.
-A history of disability.
-Can Viagra make better athletes?
-A small Colorado town’s big role in shaping the National Mall.

Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-The weirdest claims made by “Designer Vagina” websites.
-Civil War underwear.
-Japanese-American internee letters found hidden in wall.
-The historian’s curse.
-New study shows disabled parents often lose custody of their children.
-Girls in juvenile detention face health care issues.
-Is neuroscience under attack?

Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-What age you begin menstruation may have future health implications.
-The not-so-happy history behind your Black Friday shopping tradition.
-Teenage boys and body image.
-The most awesome kitchen computer from 1969.
-10 NYC street corners – then and now.
-Stalin’s daughter and the FBI.

Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-Strangest modern-day menstruation myths.
-Is neuroscience helping vegetative patients communicate with their doctors?
-The history behing the father of the modern cigarette.
-Eugenics and Nikola Tesla.
-How not to run a secure archive.
-Recording of Lee Atwater’s infamous 1981 interview released for the first time.
-Is your illness named after a Nazi?

When the Personal Really is Historical (and Scary!)

By Jacqueline Antonovich

So, I have pertussis. You may know it better as whooping cough. Believe me, the irony of a gender and medicine historian catching a 19th century disease is not lost on me. It’s hard enough to be a graduate student, a GSI (Graduate Student Instructor), a wife, and a mother of two, but throw in a good old-fashioned Oregon Trail disease, and you’ve got yourself one heck of a semester.

Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-Men looking for cat, find catacomb instead.
-10 historical (and awesome) facts about the Girl Scouts.
-Now boys are hitting puberty earlier too.
-Richard Burton’s very sexy diaries (and yes, a lot of it is about Liz).
-Very, very, very old socks.
-“Lilly of the Mohawks” officially becomes a Saint.

Because Science Says So

By Adam Turner


Vagina Week continues! With this post by Adam Turner on Naomi Wolf’s use of Science! in her new book,
Vagina: A Biography. Naomi Wolf uses a whole lot of science in her new book, Vagina: A Biography (perhaps more accurately called an autobiography). She lectures at length about the nervous system, stress responses, brain chemistry, and how all of these things seem to have their center in powerful mind-altering (heterosexual, vaginal) sex. Taking her personal experiences as a jumping-off point (itself a dubious scientific technique) Wolf references a wide variety of studies to make her argument that the vagina, broadly defined, is a driving force in women’s lives, responsible for their happiness, successful relationships, creativity, and existential health.

Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-The history of the fork is way more fascinating than you might think.
-The five most important places in history (according to one guy).
-Want to read Anne Frank’s Diary? There’s an app for that.
-Elderly are newest group to be plagued by eating disorders.
-The saddest letters you will ever read. Ever.
-Bioethicists raise concerns over personal genomes and privacy protections.