Tag: medicine

Female Circumcision, Clitoridectomy, and American Culture

In the United States, female circumcision (the removal of the clitoral hood) and clitoridectomy (the removal of the external nub of the clitoris) are nearly always regarded as practices that happen someplace else. When their presence within the United States is acknowledged, these procedures are positioned as having come from the outside, as originating with immigrants from… Read more →

Not Done Yet: Midwifing a Return to Social Birth

As a doula, I have the privilege of attending other women’s labors and deliveries. Recently I attended a delivery assisted by a midwife at a large-scale hospital. The midwife and the nursing staff supported the fearless mama as she labored away in a large room with a wall of windows looking out on a beautiful… Read more →

The Body as Archive

Trying to become a public historian and freelance writer in grad school is requiring me to walk a difficult tightrope. I want to be as authentic as humanly possible, but I’m also a professor-in-training; I don’t want to put anything out into the world that I would have trouble explaining to a hiring committee, to… Read more →

PrEP, The Pill, and the Fear of Promiscuity.

By Ian Lekus

The first I learned of PrEP, or pre-exposure prophylaxis, came from the signs and postcards around Fenway Health, Boston’s LGBT community health center. Those advertisements appeared as Fenway served as one of two U.S. research sites for PrEP, in advance of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approving Truvada in July 2012 as the first drug deemed safe and effective for reducing the risk of HIV transmission.[1] As I started learning more, I quickly discovered how its advocates frequently compare PrEP to oral contraceptives. One PrEP researcher I consulted with early on in my investigations explicitly drew the parallel to her decision to use the Pill a few years earlier. Some of the similarities jump out immediately: for example, like oral contraceptives, PrEP — a pill taken daily to prevent HIV infection — separates prevention from the act of sexual intercourse itself.

A History of Neglect

By Adam Turner

Since as far back as the American Revolution, politicians and the public have welcomed soldiers home from war with promises of cutting edge medical knowledge, comprehensive rehabilitation, and ongoing care as compensation for their service. Just as often, though, these promises have gone unfulfilled in the face of their enormous expense. The history of the veteran’s health system thus has been one of best intentions and poor funding.

Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-Walden Pond: The video game?
-Darwin’s pros and cons of marriage.
-Dead men’s teeth: A history of dentures.
-12 bizarre medical remedies from history.
-Before workplace harassment had a name.
-What was it like to discover laughing gas?

Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-Early modern hair dye?
-Preserving audio history.
-Paris reborn and destroyed.
-Who were the first “teenagers”?
-Ranch housing in postwar California.
-When cigarettes were good for women.

Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-If WWI was a bar fight.
-James Bond’s WWI origins.
-Vintage craft projects for kids.
-Women doctors in the movies.
-“Penicillin Girl” passes away in Denver.
-15 important Muslim women in history.
-Absolutely stunning photos of old Detroit.

Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-A 1950s survival guide.
-Einstein’s lost theorem.
-An oral history of Ghostbusters.
-27 strangest inventions in history.
-The quest for a sunken slave ship.
-Two suffragists, one cat, and a car.

Sunday Morning Medicine

By Jacqueline Antonovich

-Stethoscopes are really gross.
-The woman before Rosa Parks.
-The history of heroin addiction.
-Did slavery create modern medicine?
-Um…your earwax says a lot about you.
-Remembering Japan’s kamikaze pilots.